Login

You are here

Anti-Oil Tanker Campaign

Protecting Our Coast, Our Culture and Our Economy    

The Coastal First Nations has spent almost a decade studying the potential impacts of tanker oil spills within our waters. A recently completed report "A Review of Potential Impacts to Coastal First Nations from an Oil Tanker Spill Associated with the Northern Gateway Project" confirmed that a tanker spill would cause significant socioeconomic and environmental effects.

The 1,170-kilometre proposed project would bring crude oil from Alberta to the northern B.C. coast, where it would be loaded onto large crude carriers for transport to Asian refiners through the pristine waters within our territories.

Environmental Impacts:

A tanker spill would adversely impact the environment:

  • Threats to endangered and rare species;
  • Damage to or loss of habitats;
  • Population declines, particularly in top predators and long-lived species; and
  • And the transformation of natural landscapes.

A spill would also have the following impacts:

  • Negative effects on human health, well-being, or quality of life;
  • Shrinkage in the economy and unemployment;
  • Detrimental changes in land and resource use by our communities; and
  • Loss or serious damage to commercial species and resources.

It’s important to note that the Coastal First Nations report is clear that these impacts are not based on theoretical models and hypotheses but on extensive scientific records documenting impacts of an actual oil spill in a region similar to the one in which we live.

Economic Impacts:

A tanker oil spill would have devastating impacts on the marine economy.

Our study demonstrates just how important the marine economy is to coastal communities: 

  • Marine sectors on the North and Central Coasts and Haida Gwaii generate $386.5 million in revenue and provide 7,620 direct, indirect, and induced jobs;
  • Commercial fishing in our traditional territories generates $134.9 million in revenues and provides 1,310 direct, indirect, and induced jobs;
  • Seafood processing generates $88.1 million in revenues and provides 2,470 direct, indirect, and induced jobs;
  • Marine tourism generates $104.3 million in revenues and provides 2,200 direct, indirect, and induced jobs
  • Recreational fishing represents revenue of $90.5 million and provides direct, indirect, and induced employment of 1,960 jobs;
  • Marine tourism operators, including Guardian Watchmen, provide direct, indirect, and induced employment of 240 jobs; and
  • Marine transportation generates $18.6 million in revenue and provides 800 direct, indirect, and induced jobs.

It's important to note that the report is clear that these impacts are not based on theoretical models and hypotheses but on extensive scientific records documenting impacts of an actual oil spill in a region similar to the one in which we live.

The Coastal First Nations supports development that is carried out in a way that brings economic benefits to our communities and does not harm the environment. For the past decade we have worked together to create an economically and ecologically sustainable coast. We recognize we can't achieve these goals without some development within our Traditional Territories

In fact, we actively seek out developments that fit within certain criteria.

That criteria includes:

  • Recognition of our Aboriginal Title and Rights;
  • Supports economic goals of community;
  • Builds capacity in our communities; and
  • Ensures safety and health of the environment.

The proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway project imposes an unnecessary and high risk to Coastal First Nations and other British Columbians. The risks of the proposed project far outweigh the benefits and the future of Coastal First Nations health and livelihood will be under severe threat if the project goes ahead.

Press Releases

The Sound of Silence video was released on the 24th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, powerful television commercial features oil spill footage and iconic song by Simon & Garfunkel

http://coastalfirstnations.ca/news-release/march-24-2013-121pm

Re-vamped Simon & Garfunkel "Sound of Silence" commercial singles out Stephen Harper for upcoming decision on oil tanker traffic in BC’s coastal waters.

http://coastalfirstnations.ca/news-release/september-23-2013-708am

Coastal First Nations Re-Write Enbridge’s Latest Northern Gateway Pipeline Ad Campaign

Leaked copy of “Open to better” TV ad campaign suggests Enbridge brand has lost credibility with British Columbians.

http://coastalfirstnations.ca/news-release/october-1-2013-908am

First Nations "Go Undercover" to Ask World's Largest Oil Tanker Companies Who's Responsible for Spill Clean-Up Costs in Canada

http://coastalfirstnations.ca/news-release/october-8-2013-1010am

Koda and the Orca - What matters to 5 year old Koda from the Gitga'at Nation? Watch Coastal First Nations new video Koda and the Orca.

http://coastalfirstnations.ca/news-release/october-17-2013-859am

Publications

Read Report: A Review of Offshore Oil and Gas Development in British Columbia

This report integrates the environmental, social, legal, economic and regulatory issues associated with offshore oil and gas development. The report provides our community members with valuable information on the issue of oil and gas.

Oil & Gas Newsletter

Oil Tanker Impacts.pdf